EMV Shift : Real Life “Mad Men” Take on EMV Marketing

EMV PICTURE

EMV Shift : Real Life “Mad Men” Take on EMV Marketing

One of the more difficult challenges of the U.S. EMV conversion is getting the word out, especially given the urgency of the October deadline the card networks set for a fraud liability shift.

Some companies are starting to treat this marketing challenge as an opportunity, making their advertising more about the shift to EMV security than about their own products. ShopKeep, a mobile point of sale provider, is running an advertising campaign that cuts straight to the chase.

One ad states bluntly: “The card companies will hold you liable for fraud if you don’t have EMV technology — liable for their cards. That’s going to make you mad.”

Partners and Napier New York produced the ShopKeep ad campaign, which features two television spots and other digital content. One of the TV spots is a branding message around ShopKeep tied to the need to migrate to EMV, the other general messaging around EMV, liability and ShopKeep’s role.

“The liability shift is coming, and among our target market of small to medium sized businesses there’s not a lot of awareness,” said Brian Zang, senior vice president of sales and marketing at ShopKeep. “They mostly have their heads down running their businesses.”

“It starts with consumers. Consumers don’t necessarily know what EMV is,” Zang said. “If you’ve traveled that means ‘OK, my card has a chip on it now.’ But I don’t think that people understand what it means for the larger payment industry.”

CardWorks Acquiring – Merchant Services continues to work with our industry partners to provide merchants with affordable, easy-to-implement EMV solutions with the industry’s best security capabilities. To ensure your equipment is EMV compliant, contact CardWorks Acquiring Merchant Support today at (866) 210-4625 X1 or via email at merchantsupport@cardworks.com.

To read the rest of this story, visit PAYMENT SOURCE.


EMV Shift : Real Life "Mad Men" Take on EMV Marketing

EMV PICTURE

EMV Shift : Real Life “Mad Men” Take on EMV Marketing

One of the more difficult challenges of the U.S. EMV conversion is getting the word out, especially given the urgency of the October deadline the card networks set for a fraud liability shift.

Some companies are starting to treat this marketing challenge as an opportunity, making their advertising more about the shift to EMV security than about their own products. ShopKeep, a mobile point of sale provider, is running an advertising campaign that cuts straight to the chase.

One ad states bluntly: “The card companies will hold you liable for fraud if you don’t have EMV technology — liable for their cards. That’s going to make you mad.”

Partners and Napier New York produced the ShopKeep ad campaign, which features two television spots and other digital content. One of the TV spots is a branding message around ShopKeep tied to the need to migrate to EMV, the other general messaging around EMV, liability and ShopKeep’s role.

“The liability shift is coming, and among our target market of small to medium sized businesses there’s not a lot of awareness,” said Brian Zang, senior vice president of sales and marketing at ShopKeep. “They mostly have their heads down running their businesses.”

“It starts with consumers. Consumers don’t necessarily know what EMV is,” Zang said. “If you’ve traveled that means ‘OK, my card has a chip on it now.’ But I don’t think that people understand what it means for the larger payment industry.”

CardWorks Acquiring – Merchant Services continues to work with our industry partners to provide merchants with affordable, easy-to-implement EMV solutions with the industry’s best security capabilities. To ensure your equipment is EMV compliant, contact CardWorks Acquiring Merchant Support today at (866) 210-4625 X1 or via email at merchantsupport@cardworks.com.

To read the rest of this story, visit PAYMENT SOURCE.


Alibaba’s New Bar Code Could Fight Return Fraud

 

Alibaba

 

Alibaba has started using a modified version of a QR code to fight counterfeit fraud and enable individualized marketing.  And the payments potential for such an offering is huge, delivering something akin to a non-wireless version of item-level RFID.

The new code is like a QR code only in appearance, and that appearance was chosen for the familiarity that consumers and merchants have with scanning a QR code. The identifier, which is unique to each individual item on a store’s shelf, can add a huge amount of data to each purchase. For example, a retailer who suspects a fraudulent return — an item being returned that was purchased elsewhere or stolen — can use the code to determine whether that item came from its inventory and whether it was paid for.

“It certainly closes a door that exposes a retailer to a great deal of expense, by virtually eliminating return fraud,” said Thad Peterson, a senior payments analyst at The Aite Group. “If every product has a unique identifier, then any time a product is returned to the store, the nature of the transaction prior to that return can be determined, including if there ever was one.”

This type of fraud exploits store policies that allow for returns without a receipt. But there are other uses for this technology at the point of sale. “This adds a massive amount of data to CRM and general data management, throwing in so much incremental data that you simply didn’t have before,” Peterson said.

Alibaba has been working with an Israeli tech company called Visualead and has licensed its Dotless Visual Code Technology to use in these bar codes. L’Oréal and Ferrero also use this technology. In Alibaba’s case, the codes can be read by the Chinese e-commerce company’s Taobao mobile app.

 

Read the rest of this article on PaymentsSource


Alibaba's New Bar Code Could Fight Return Fraud

 

Alibaba

 

Alibaba has started using a modified version of a QR code to fight counterfeit fraud and enable individualized marketing.  And the payments potential for such an offering is huge, delivering something akin to a non-wireless version of item-level RFID.

The new code is like a QR code only in appearance, and that appearance was chosen for the familiarity that consumers and merchants have with scanning a QR code. The identifier, which is unique to each individual item on a store’s shelf, can add a huge amount of data to each purchase. For example, a retailer who suspects a fraudulent return — an item being returned that was purchased elsewhere or stolen — can use the code to determine whether that item came from its inventory and whether it was paid for.

“It certainly closes a door that exposes a retailer to a great deal of expense, by virtually eliminating return fraud,” said Thad Peterson, a senior payments analyst at The Aite Group. “If every product has a unique identifier, then any time a product is returned to the store, the nature of the transaction prior to that return can be determined, including if there ever was one.”

This type of fraud exploits store policies that allow for returns without a receipt. But there are other uses for this technology at the point of sale. “This adds a massive amount of data to CRM and general data management, throwing in so much incremental data that you simply didn’t have before,” Peterson said.

Alibaba has been working with an Israeli tech company called Visualead and has licensed its Dotless Visual Code Technology to use in these bar codes. L’Oréal and Ferrero also use this technology. In Alibaba’s case, the codes can be read by the Chinese e-commerce company’s Taobao mobile app.

 

Read the rest of this article on PaymentsSource


EMV: Chase Begins Issuing EMV Debit Cards

Chase_debit_EMV_hero_phixr

Banking giant JP Morgan Chase & Co. has begun issuing EMV debit cards, with plans to convert its entire debit card portfolio of 34 million cards to chip by the end of 2016, Chase announced Tuesday. Chase began testing chip-enabled debit card issuance in Arizona and Illinois two months ago, a Chase spokesman tells Digital Transactions News. Chase expects 70% of its debit cards to have chips by year’s end. The spokesman would not say how much the EMV debit conversion will cost Chase. One estimate is that a chip card may cost between $3 and $7 to issue. On the low end, the conversion thus might cost $102 million.

Chase debit card holders with lost, stolen, damaged, or expired cards will receive the chip versions first, as will consumers opening new accounts. “Our mass reissuance will occur in the next 12 months,” the spokesman says. The plans also call for converting Chase’s Liquid prepaid cards to chip.

EMV is meant to better secure point-of-sale transactions by migrating credit and debit cards from magnetic-stripe payments to chip ones. Issuers are expected to dramatically increase the number of chip-enabled credit and debit cards over the next several months in anticipation of the payment card networks’ Oct. 1 liability shifts that will place the onus for fraudulent transactions at the point of sale on the party, whether it’s the merchant or acquirer, least prepared for an EMV transaction.

CardWorks Acquiring – Merchant Services continues to work with our industry partners to provide merchants with affordable, easy-to-implement EMV solutions with the industry’s best security capabilities. To ensure your equipment is EMV compliant, contact CardWorks Acquiring Merchant Support today at (866) 210-4625 X1 or via email at merchantsupport@cardworks.com.

Want to read the rest of this story? Check out Digital Transactions.


MasterCard Makes Analytics Deep Dive With a $600 Million Acquisition

MasterCard Inc. announced Monday it is spending $600 million to buy Applied Predictive Technologies Inc., an Arlington, Va.-based company that provides analytics services to retailers, financial institutions, and other companies.  The deal, expected to close in the second quarter, provides MasterCard with yet another service for merchants.

“Merchants, like financial institutions and governments, are one of our core customers,” a MasterCard spokesman tells Digital Transactions News in an email. “Applied Predictive Technologies’ world-class talent, technology, and Test & Learn platform, matched with MasterCard’s analytics, will give our customers the advantage of enhanced and operationalized decision making.”

Test & Learn is a cloud-based software tool that enables clients to test various scenarios. Among them is a basket analyzer that can help retailers determine which products to promote and which to eliminate and options for structuring promotions. Another scenario might be quantifying the impact of online advertising on in-store sales.

MasterCard says Applied Predictive Technologies now will have access to MasterCard’s analytics tools, consulting, and marketing services. Applied Predictive Technologies also has office in San Francisco, London, Taipei, Taiwan, Tokyo, Sydney, and Bentonville, Ark.

 

From Digital Transactions


Apple Pay Progress Report

Since the debut of Apple Pay in October 2014, analysts have kept a watchful eye on this promising entrant in the mobile contactless payments field. Four months after the launch, consumer adoption of Apple Pay has reached 11 percent of cardholder households and 66 percent of iPhone 6 owners, according to research conducted by Phoenix Marketing International.

Phoenix revealed that during the first four months, 82 percent of early adopters had linked credit cards to Apple Pay, 53 percent debit cards and 20 percent general purpose re-loadable prepaid cards. Entering month five, 31 percent of iPhone 6 owners who signed up for Apple Pay still had not attempted to link a card, and 3 percent who had made an attempt failed in the process, leaving room for more users to link cards in the future.

Moving to the next stage in Apple Pay mobile commerce, 88 percent of consumers who set up an Apple mobile wallet within the first four months of launch went on to make in-store or in-app purchases, raising the conversion rate for a new mobile wallet scheme above 50 percent for the first time, according to analysts.

Read the story at GreenSheet.com