As Mobile Checkout Evolves, Companies Like Scandit Find A Place in Payments

7-Eleven Inc. is among the latest retailers to empower consumers to become their own point-of-sale checkout when they use an app on their smart phones.

A central component of that capability is the image-capture tool built into the app. The 7-Eleven Scan & Pay service, which is in tests now and is expected to have greater availability in 2019, relies on Scandit AG image-capture technology to accurately scan a product bar code.

The Scandit algorithm first determines there is an object in the smart phone’s camera view, then it identifies the barcode, Samuel Mueller, chief executive and cofounder, tells Digital Transactions News. The barcode is decoded and converted into a universal product code. That information is sent to the merchant’s backend system for identification and pricing information, which is then rendered on the device, he says. The process happens in milliseconds.

Scandit’s role in payment is its ability to capture the product information via an image. Zurich-based Scandit does not provide the actual transaction function. Instead, most clients use existing payments partners, Mueller says.

The technology will only become more vital as more retailers adopt similar self-checkout services, Mueller says. “If you think about some of the big trends and visible projects in the market, one of the things that comes to mind is AmazonGo,” Mueller says. Amazon.com Inc.’s AmazonGo convenience stores use sensors and cameras to determine which items a shopper picks up and leaves the store with. The payment is made using the consumer’s Amazon payment credentials.

While AmazonGo is limited to a handful of store locations and to consumers with Amazon accounts, and also carries a high cost to duplicate, apps that focus on the consumer stand a better chance for retailer adoption, Mueller says. The trend to enable consumers to check out on their own phones has much broader appeal, he says. That also means self-checkout is available to more store types, too.

“What’s generally the case across these solutions is the shopping happens at the consumer’s own pace,” Mueller says. It also is much more personal, given the consumer may have started the shopping process with a map search or product search prior to visiting the store.

Some retailers may even adopt augmented-reality shopping, he suggests. In this scenario, once a shopper activates a retailer app and points the phone’s camera at products in a store, she could see pricing and product information and filter for size and other attributes. This will result in technology that can seamlessly blend the physical and digital shopping realms, Mueller says.

Others are trying to combine the two shopping environments. Earlier this week, MasterCard Incsaid it was working with Next Retail Concepts on a 3-D shoppable online experience.

Source: http://www.digitaltransactions.net/as-mobile-checkout-evolves-companies-like-scandit-find-a-place-in-payments/

How Can Merchants Close the EMV-NFC Knowledge Gap?

 

 

EMV NFC

One of the more perplexing elements of the slow, long-awaited march to EMV-chip cards in the U.S. is the lack of awareness that still pervades among merchants and consumers alike.

At the same time, mobile wallets such as Apple Pay have had no trouble becoming household names despite having fairly low adoption.

Three months past the U.S. EMV liability shift — the soft deadline set by the card networks for EMV adoption — Scott Holt, a vice president at Ingenico in North America, sees a chance to finally shift consumers away from their old payment methods. The twist is that it won’t be by consumers’ choice.

By the end of 2016, much of the U.S. retail market will be compliant with EMV and mobile wallets, Holt said. Consumers will have no choice but to abandon magnetic stripe payments, but when they do it will open up the opportunities to choose something other than EMV’s chip-and-dip process, he said. “People will have to learn a new experience with EMV anyway.”

The migration to both Near Field Communication-based wallets and EMV will place pressure on floor-level personnel at retailers to educate consumers on the new technologies. In particular, cashiers are the key to a smooth transition to new payments technology, as Beatta McInerney, a business development manager of payments for point of sale technology company ScanSource POS and Barcode, explains in recent column for PaymentsSource.

Retailers must train cashiers to spot if a consumer has an EMV chip even if the merchant is not accepting EMV cards at this point, McInerney said. This gives retailers an opportunity to teach the process at a more measured pace.

“Consumer experience is largely dependent on the education of retailers,” Holt said, adding that includes the skills to recognize and help consumers who are confused about how the new terminals work. Placing the right prompts into point of sale software is also important, he said.

The delays aside, Ingenico reports the EMV migration in the U.S. is progressing similar to other countries, adding it’s tracking the migration to tailor the education it will provide to merchants over the course of the next year.

Read the rest of this article at PAYMENTSSOURCE.COM.


TSYS and Ingenico Group to Offer New Semi-Integrated EMV Solution

 

 

TSYS TSS, -1.12% a leading global payments provider, and Ingenico Group , a global leader in seamless payments, today announced a new semi-integrated solution to simplify the EMV [®] certification process. TSYS is the first processor to Class A certify Ingenico Group’s new offering, which is designed to enable partners with the ability to easily build and deploy secure EMV and NFC solutions.

The combined TSYS and Ingenico Group offering provides Value-Added Resellers (VARs) and Integrated Software Vendors (ISVs) with a simple and secure pathway to begin enabling EMV payments. This easy-to-implement solution empowers VARs and ISVs to focus on developing their core products, while offering them a secure method for accepting payments, including magnetic stripe, EMV and NFC contactless payments.

Using a semi-integrated approach, communications between the PIN pad and point-of-sale (POS) system are limited to non-sensitive exchanges, preventing card data from entering the POS. By taking the POS out of the payment flow process, not only are EMV certification and PCI compliance simplified, but overall costs and time required for EMV implementation are reduced as well. Fully certified through all major card brands, this new TSYS-certified solution also has the ability to process with TSYS Guardian Encryption [SM] , ensuring payments are both reliable and secure.

 

For the rest of this article, head to MARKETWATCH.

 

For any further questions about the exciting advances with Ingenico products, please contact CardWorks merchant support:

(866) 210-4625 X1

merchantsupport@cardworks.com


CardWorks Merchant Services Heading To WSAA

wsaa

 

CardWorks is heading to Henderson. NV and the M Resort for the Annual WSAA Conference.  With sponsors from all sectors of our industry, this event is sure to be informative and provide for excellent networking opportunities.

MUST SEE SEMINARS

 

Wednesday

 

Field Guide for ISO’s: Sponsored by American Express

11 AM    Introductions: Mark Dunn, Field Guide Enterprises

11:10 AM  EMV ‐ That Ship has not sailed, you can still get on board: Mark Dunn, Field Guide Enterprises

11:50 AM  How artificial intelligence can ensure required compliance: Neil Jones, Rippleshot

12:30 PM   Selling value added products: Marc Beauchamp, PayProTec

2:10 PM    Alternative lending ‐ How ISO’s make money: Scott Griest, Rapid Capital Funding

2:50 PM    Cracking the medical payments market: Mary Winingham, Mirror Consulting

Thursday

The Technology Bet

Ken Elderts, VP, ISO Sales, AnywhereCommerce

Cory Capoccia, President, Womply

John Priore, President and CEO, Priority Payment Systems

Moderator: Xavier Ayala, CEO, Managing Partner, ONESOURCE Business Advisors. President, WSAA

This dynamic panel of experts will discuss payment technology innovation geared towards enhancing the merchant and consumer payments experience. Discover which technologies merchants and consumers are adopting and how retailers are reducing friction at the POS and using big data to understand their businesses and customers better to increase customer loyalty. Learn how payment technology is becoming more intuitive, transparent, and enhancing the merchant and consumer experience.

How to Manage Through ISO Growing Pains ‐ Hit, Stay, or Fold?

Michael Cottrell, Director, Global Sales and Marketing, ProPay

Jeremy Wing, President, Payscape

Donna Embry, Chief Payments Advisor, Payment Alliance International

Moderator: Deana Rich, CEO, Deana Rich Consulting

During this session a respected panel of industry leaders will discuss the life cycle of the ISO, focusing on major decisions that often must be faced in growing your business. Is registration truly required to be successful? Is a retail model the best solution, or is wholesale the answer? What are the implications of the liability versus no‐liability landscape?

For more details regarding the agenda of the event and specific sponsors, CLICK HERE.

If you will be in Las Vegas and would like to meet with a member of our team, please email CardWorks Partnerships.


B2B Commerce Tech Is Finally Catching Up to Consumer Payments

evolve-business-phone-ss-ps

We used to be content just searching online for information on products, scanning the latest news or finding out what our friends and family were up to.

But today we expect consumer e-commerce and payment sites to be intelligent and deliver experiences that are personal and relevant, and to know things about us and anticipate our needs within the context of our actions and to execute them in line with our personal preferences and company policies. To help us not only do things faster, but better. After lagging consumer payments, business to business payments is finally catching up to that level of function.

Technology has unleashed a host of new data. And by mining this data for insights and delivering them to the right people at the right times, technology can make us more intelligent and ultimately drive advantage.

Business networks are turning these scenarios into realities for the procurement industry. By leveraging the hundreds of billions of dollars of financial transactions and transactional data along with relationship history that resides in business networks, for instance, buyers and sellers can make more informed decisions by detecting changes in buying patterns or pricing trends. This provides organizations with more confidence and qualifying information on a potential, yet unfamiliar, trading partner.

And, when combined with community-generated ratings and content, they can glean not only real-time insights, but also recommended strategies for moving their businesses forward. So, things like performance ratings where buyers rate suppliers and suppliers rate buyers. Others in the community can use this information to help detect risk in their supply chain or determine who to do business with – much like a consumer might read a product review before purchasing something online.

For any questions regarding this article, please contact CardWorks Merchant Support at (866) 210-4625 X1 or email merchantsupport@cardworks.com.

To continue reading, please go to PAYMENT SOURCE.


Alibaba’s New Bar Code Could Fight Return Fraud

 

Alibaba

 

Alibaba has started using a modified version of a QR code to fight counterfeit fraud and enable individualized marketing.  And the payments potential for such an offering is huge, delivering something akin to a non-wireless version of item-level RFID.

The new code is like a QR code only in appearance, and that appearance was chosen for the familiarity that consumers and merchants have with scanning a QR code. The identifier, which is unique to each individual item on a store’s shelf, can add a huge amount of data to each purchase. For example, a retailer who suspects a fraudulent return — an item being returned that was purchased elsewhere or stolen — can use the code to determine whether that item came from its inventory and whether it was paid for.

“It certainly closes a door that exposes a retailer to a great deal of expense, by virtually eliminating return fraud,” said Thad Peterson, a senior payments analyst at The Aite Group. “If every product has a unique identifier, then any time a product is returned to the store, the nature of the transaction prior to that return can be determined, including if there ever was one.”

This type of fraud exploits store policies that allow for returns without a receipt. But there are other uses for this technology at the point of sale. “This adds a massive amount of data to CRM and general data management, throwing in so much incremental data that you simply didn’t have before,” Peterson said.

Alibaba has been working with an Israeli tech company called Visualead and has licensed its Dotless Visual Code Technology to use in these bar codes. L’Oréal and Ferrero also use this technology. In Alibaba’s case, the codes can be read by the Chinese e-commerce company’s Taobao mobile app.

 

Read the rest of this article on PaymentsSource


Alibaba's New Bar Code Could Fight Return Fraud

 

Alibaba

 

Alibaba has started using a modified version of a QR code to fight counterfeit fraud and enable individualized marketing.  And the payments potential for such an offering is huge, delivering something akin to a non-wireless version of item-level RFID.

The new code is like a QR code only in appearance, and that appearance was chosen for the familiarity that consumers and merchants have with scanning a QR code. The identifier, which is unique to each individual item on a store’s shelf, can add a huge amount of data to each purchase. For example, a retailer who suspects a fraudulent return — an item being returned that was purchased elsewhere or stolen — can use the code to determine whether that item came from its inventory and whether it was paid for.

“It certainly closes a door that exposes a retailer to a great deal of expense, by virtually eliminating return fraud,” said Thad Peterson, a senior payments analyst at The Aite Group. “If every product has a unique identifier, then any time a product is returned to the store, the nature of the transaction prior to that return can be determined, including if there ever was one.”

This type of fraud exploits store policies that allow for returns without a receipt. But there are other uses for this technology at the point of sale. “This adds a massive amount of data to CRM and general data management, throwing in so much incremental data that you simply didn’t have before,” Peterson said.

Alibaba has been working with an Israeli tech company called Visualead and has licensed its Dotless Visual Code Technology to use in these bar codes. L’Oréal and Ferrero also use this technology. In Alibaba’s case, the codes can be read by the Chinese e-commerce company’s Taobao mobile app.

 

Read the rest of this article on PaymentsSource